NY Times : Les bas salaires des enseignants ont un coût élevé pour la société

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas

NY Times : Les bas salaires des enseignants ont un coût élevé pour la société

Message par John le Lun 2 Mai 2011 - 0:32

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/05/01/opinion/01eggers.html?src=ISMR_AP_LO_MST_FB

The High Cost of Low Teacher Salaries
By DAVE EGGERS and NÍNIVE CLEMENTS CALEGARI
Published: April 30, 2011

WHEN we don’t get the results we want in our military endeavors, we don’t blame the soldiers. We don’t say, “It’s these lazy soldiers and their bloated benefits plans! That’s why we haven’t done better in Afghanistan!” No, if the results aren’t there, we blame the planners. We blame the generals, the secretary of defense, the Joint Chiefs of Staff. No one contemplates blaming the men and women fighting every day in the trenches for little pay and scant recognition.

And yet in education we do just that. When we don’t like the way our students score on international standardized tests, we blame the teachers. When we don’t like the way particular schools perform, we blame the teachers and restrict their resources.


Compare this with our approach to our military: when results on the ground are not what we hoped, we think of ways to better support soldiers. We try to give them better tools, better weapons, better protection, better training. And when recruiting is down, we offer incentives.

We have a rare chance now, with many teachers near retirement, to prove we’re serious about education. The first step is to make the teaching profession more attractive to college graduates. This will take some doing.

At the moment, the average teacher’s pay is on par with that of a toll taker or bartender. Teachers make 14 percent less than professionals in other occupations that require similar levels of education. In real terms, teachers’ salaries have declined for 30 years. The average starting salary is $39,000; the average ending salary — after 25 years in the profession — is $67,000. This prices teachers out of home ownership in 32 metropolitan areas, and makes raising a family on one salary near impossible.

So how do teachers cope? Sixty-two percent work outside the classroom to make ends meet.
For Erik Benner, an award-winning history teacher in Keller, Tex., money has been a constant struggle. He has two children, and for 15 years has been unable to support them on his salary. Every weekday, he goes directly from Trinity Springs Middle School to drive a forklift at Floor and Décor. He works until 11 every night, then gets up and starts all over again. Does this look like “A Plan,” either on the state or federal level?

We’ve been working with public school teachers for 10 years; every spring, we see many of the best teachers leave the profession. They’re mowed down by the long hours, low pay, the lack of support and respect.

Imagine a novice teacher, thrown into an urban school, told to teach five classes a day, with up to 40 students each. At the year’s end, if test scores haven’t risen enough, he or she is called a bad teacher. For college graduates who have other options, this kind of pressure, for such low pay, doesn’t make much sense. So every year 20 percent of teachers in urban districts quit. Nationwide, 46 percent of teachers quit before their fifth year. The turnover costs the United States $7.34 billion yearly. The effect within schools — especially those in urban communities where turnover is highest — is devastating.

But we can reverse course. In the next 10 years, over half of the nation’s nearly 3.2 million public school teachers will become eligible for retirement. Who will replace them? How do we attract and keep the best minds in the profession?

People talk about accountability, measurements, tenure, test scores and pay for performance. These questions are worthy of debate, but are secondary to recruiting and training teachers and treating them fairly. There is no silver bullet that will fix every last school in America, but until we solve the problem of teacher turnover, we don’t have a chance.

Can we do better? Can we generate “A Plan”? Of course.

The consulting firm McKinsey recently examined how we might attract and retain a talented teaching force. The study compared the treatment of teachers here and in the three countries that perform best on standardized tests: Finland, Singapore and South Korea.

Turns out these countries have an entirely different approach to the profession. First, the governments in these countries recruit top graduates to the profession. (We don’t.) In Finland and Singapore they pay for training. (We don’t.) In terms of purchasing power, South Korea pays teachers on average 250 percent of what we do.

And most of all, they trust their teachers. They are rightly seen as the solution, not the problem, and when improvement is needed, the school receives support and development, not punishment. Accordingly, turnover in these countries is startlingly low: In South Korea, it’s 1 percent per year. In Finland, it’s 2 percent. In Singapore, 3 percent.


McKinsey polled 900 top-tier American college students and found that 68 percent would consider teaching if salaries started at $65,000 and rose to a maximum of $150,000. Could we do this? If we’re committed to “winning the future,” we should. If any administration is capable of tackling this, it’s the current one. President Obama and Education Secretary Arne Duncan understand the centrality of teachers and have said that improving our education system begins and ends with great teachers. But world-class education costs money.

For those who say, “How do we pay for this?” — well, how are we paying for three concurrent wars? How did we pay for the interstate highway system? Or the bailout of the savings and loans in 1989 and that of the investment banks in 2008? How did we pay for the equally ambitious project of sending Americans to the moon? We had the vision and we had the will and we found a way.

Dave Eggers and Nínive Clements Calegari are founders of the 826 National tutoring centers and producers of the documentary “American Teacher.”

A faire lire par tous les sociologues, les partis politiques, les syndicats et les têtes pensantes de l'éducation !


Dernière édition par John le Lun 2 Mai 2011 - 0:35, édité 2 fois

_________________
En achetant des articles au lien ci-dessous, vous nous aidez, sans frais, à gérer le forum. Merci !


"Celui qui ne participe pas à la lutte participe à la défaite" (Brecht)
"La nostalgie, c'est plus ce que c'était" (Simone Signoret)
"Les médias participent à la falsification permanente de l'information" (Umberto Eco)

John
Médiateur


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: NY Times : Les bas salaires des enseignants ont un coût élevé pour la société

Message par Abraxas le Lun 2 Mai 2011 - 6:58

Remarquable article…
Très proche de la fameuse citation de Lincoln : "Si vous trouvez que l'Education coûte cher, essayez l'ignorance."

Abraxas
Doyen


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: NY Times : Les bas salaires des enseignants ont un coût élevé pour la société

Message par Daphné le Lun 2 Mai 2011 - 7:52

@John a écrit:http://www.nytimes.com/2011/05/01/opinion/01eggers.html?src=ISMR_AP_LO_MST_FB

The High Cost of Low Teacher Salaries
By DAVE EGGERS and NÍNIVE CLEMENTS CALEGARI
Published: April 30, 2011

WHEN we don’t get the results we want in our military endeavors, we don’t blame the soldiers. We don’t say, “It’s these lazy soldiers and their bloated benefits plans! That’s why we haven’t done better in Afghanistan!” No, if the results aren’t there, we blame the planners. We blame the generals, the secretary of defense, the Joint Chiefs of Staff. No one contemplates blaming the men and women fighting every day in the trenches for little pay and scant recognition.

And yet in education we do just that. When we don’t like the way our students score on international standardized tests, we blame the teachers. When we don’t like the way particular schools perform, we blame the teachers and restrict their resources.


Compare this with our approach to our military: when results on the ground are not what we hoped, we think of ways to better support soldiers. We try to give them better tools, better weapons, better protection, better training. And when recruiting is down, we offer incentives.

We have a rare chance now, with many teachers near retirement, to prove we’re serious about education. The first step is to make the teaching profession more attractive to college graduates. This will take some doing.

At the moment, the average teacher’s pay is on par with that of a toll taker or bartender. Teachers make 14 percent less than professionals in other occupations that require similar levels of education. In real terms, teachers’ salaries have declined for 30 years. The average starting salary is $39,000; the average ending salary — after 25 years in the profession — is $67,000. This prices teachers out of home ownership in 32 metropolitan areas, and makes raising a family on one salary near impossible.

So how do teachers cope? Sixty-two percent work outside the classroom to make ends meet.
For Erik Benner, an award-winning history teacher in Keller, Tex., money has been a constant struggle. He has two children, and for 15 years has been unable to support them on his salary. Every weekday, he goes directly from Trinity Springs Middle School to drive a forklift at Floor and Décor. He works until 11 every night, then gets up and starts all over again. Does this look like “A Plan,” either on the state or federal level?

We’ve been working with public school teachers for 10 years; every spring, we see many of the best teachers leave the profession. They’re mowed down by the long hours, low pay, the lack of support and respect.

Imagine a novice teacher, thrown into an urban school, told to teach five classes a day, with up to 40 students each. At the year’s end, if test scores haven’t risen enough, he or she is called a bad teacher. For college graduates who have other options, this kind of pressure, for such low pay, doesn’t make much sense. So every year 20 percent of teachers in urban districts quit. Nationwide, 46 percent of teachers quit before their fifth year. The turnover costs the United States $7.34 billion yearly. The effect within schools — especially those in urban communities where turnover is highest — is devastating.

But we can reverse course. In the next 10 years, over half of the nation’s nearly 3.2 million public school teachers will become eligible for retirement. Who will replace them? How do we attract and keep the best minds in the profession?

People talk about accountability, measurements, tenure, test scores and pay for performance. These questions are worthy of debate, but are secondary to recruiting and training teachers and treating them fairly. There is no silver bullet that will fix every last school in America, but until we solve the problem of teacher turnover, we don’t have a chance.

Can we do better? Can we generate “A Plan”? Of course.

The consulting firm McKinsey recently examined how we might attract and retain a talented teaching force. The study compared the treatment of teachers here and in the three countries that perform best on standardized tests: Finland, Singapore and South Korea.

Turns out these countries have an entirely different approach to the profession. First, the governments in these countries recruit top graduates to the profession. (We don’t.) In Finland and Singapore they pay for training. (We don’t.) In terms of purchasing power, South Korea pays teachers on average 250 percent of what we do.

And most of all, they trust their teachers. They are rightly seen as the solution, not the problem, and when improvement is needed, the school receives support and development, not punishment. Accordingly, turnover in these countries is startlingly low: In South Korea, it’s 1 percent per year. In Finland, it’s 2 percent. In Singapore, 3 percent.


McKinsey polled 900 top-tier American college students and found that 68 percent would consider teaching if salaries started at $65,000 and rose to a maximum of $150,000. Could we do this? If we’re committed to “winning the future,” we should. If any administration is capable of tackling this, it’s the current one. President Obama and Education Secretary Arne Duncan understand the centrality of teachers and have said that improving our education system begins and ends with great teachers. But world-class education costs money.

For those who say, “How do we pay for this?” — well, how are we paying for three concurrent wars? How did we pay for the interstate highway system? Or the bailout of the savings and loans in 1989 and that of the investment banks in 2008? How did we pay for the equally ambitious project of sending Americans to the moon? We had the vision and we had the will and we found a way.

Dave Eggers and Nínive Clements Calegari are founders of the 826 National tutoring centers and producers of the documentary “American Teacher.”

A faire lire par tous les sociologues, les partis politiques, les syndicats et les têtes pensantes de l'éducation !

On est au courant John Laughing
Très bon article, on est bien d'accord avec ce qui est dit !

Daphné
Demi-dieu


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: NY Times : Les bas salaires des enseignants ont un coût élevé pour la société

Message par Reine Margot le Lun 2 Mai 2011 - 7:55

très bon article, qui montre bien qu'une fois de plus, nous nous commençons à appliquer des choses qui depuis des décennies ne marchent pas ailleurs, alors que les pays étrangers sont en train d'en revenir.

_________________
1 enseignant molesté, c’est un fait divers, pas un phénomène de société.
2 enseignants molestés, c’est un fait divers, pas un phénomène de société.
150 enseignants molestés, ce sont des faits divers, pas des phénomènes de société.
151 enseignants molestés, ce sont des faits divers, pas des phénomènes de société.
………………………………
[la progression arithmétique se poursuit en série]
…………………………………..
156 879 enseignants molestés, ce sont des faits divers, pas des phénomènes de société.
156 880 enseignants molestés, ce sont des faits divers, pas des phénomènes de société. »

Reine Margot
Demi-dieu


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: NY Times : Les bas salaires des enseignants ont un coût élevé pour la société

Message par Cath le Lun 2 Mai 2011 - 13:48

Si seulement...

Cath
Esprit sacré


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: NY Times : Les bas salaires des enseignants ont un coût élevé pour la société

Message par Pierre_au_carré le Lun 2 Mai 2011 - 14:26

@Abraxas a écrit:Remarquable article…
Très proche de la fameuse citation de Lincoln : "Si vous trouvez que l'Education coûte cher, essayez l'ignorance."

Et aussi de Ségolène Royal...

Pierre_au_carré
Guide spirituel


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: NY Times : Les bas salaires des enseignants ont un coût élevé pour la société

Message par John le Lun 2 Mai 2011 - 14:29

Tu rigoles ?

Dans l'article, on t'explique que 62% des enseignants US doivent faire un second boulot pour joindre les deux bouts.

Royal rigolait que les enseignants français aient le temps d'aller se faire payer à prix d'or des cours particuliers chez Acadomia.

Il y a bien un point commun, mais les deux disent l'exact opposé.

_________________
En achetant des articles au lien ci-dessous, vous nous aidez, sans frais, à gérer le forum. Merci !


"Celui qui ne participe pas à la lutte participe à la défaite" (Brecht)
"La nostalgie, c'est plus ce que c'était" (Simone Signoret)
"Les médias participent à la falsification permanente de l'information" (Umberto Eco)

John
Médiateur


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: NY Times : Les bas salaires des enseignants ont un coût élevé pour la société

Message par Libé-Ration le Lun 2 Mai 2011 - 14:33

A faire lire à tous ceux qui pensent que nous sommes de grosses faignasses trop bien payés...

Libé-Ration
Guide spirituel


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: NY Times : Les bas salaires des enseignants ont un coût élevé pour la société

Message par Pierre_au_carré le Lun 2 Mai 2011 - 14:40

@John a écrit:Tu rigoles ?

Dans l'article, on t'explique que 62% des enseignants US doivent faire un second boulot pour joindre les deux bouts.

Royal rigolait que les enseignants français aient le temps d'aller se faire payer à prix d'or des cours particuliers chez Acadomia.

Il y a bien un point commun, mais les deux disent l'exact opposé.

Non, non, c'est ce qu'elle a dit ce WE. Et son thème phare pour 2012...

Pierre_au_carré
Guide spirituel


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: NY Times : Les bas salaires des enseignants ont un coût élevé pour la société

Message par Invité le Lun 2 Mai 2011 - 14:42

qu'est-ce qu'elle a dit exactement?

Invité
Invité


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: NY Times : Les bas salaires des enseignants ont un coût élevé pour la société

Message par ysabel le Lun 2 Mai 2011 - 15:28

elle a dit la citation de Lincoln

_________________
« vous qui entrez, laissez toute espérance ». Dante

« Il vaut mieux n’avoir rien promis que promettre sans accomplir » (L’Ecclésiaste)

ysabel
Enchanteur


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: NY Times : Les bas salaires des enseignants ont un coût élevé pour la société

Message par Invité le Lun 2 Mai 2011 - 15:35

ah bon! j'ai cru qu'elle voulait que les profs soient mieux payés, j'ai eu peur!!

Invité
Invité


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: NY Times : Les bas salaires des enseignants ont un coût élevé pour la société

Message par papillonbleu le Lun 2 Mai 2011 - 19:48

Très intéressant... je me le garde sous le coude.

papillonbleu
Grand sage


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: NY Times : Les bas salaires des enseignants ont un coût élevé pour la société

Message par loup des steppes le Lun 2 Mai 2011 - 20:15

@Reine Margot a écrit:très bon article, qui montre bien qu'une fois de plus, nous nous commençons à appliquer des choses qui depuis des décennies ne marchent pas ailleurs, alors que les pays étrangers sont en train d'en revenir.

+100
Exactement ce que je dis toujours, et à propos de bien d'autres topics aussi sérieux, hélas! topela

_________________
[i] "Là où sont mes pieds, je suis à ma place." prov. Amérindien
"Choose the words you use with care: they create the world around you"

loup des steppes
Neoprof expérimenté


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: NY Times : Les bas salaires des enseignants ont un coût élevé pour la société

Message par olivier-np30 le Lun 2 Mai 2011 - 20:36

En France le salaire median est de 1600 nets...Je doute qu'en GB ce soit mieux: Il faut donc voir ce qu'on entend par bas salaire.

_________________
Quadra aujourd'hui, quinqua demain

olivier-np30
Habitué du forum


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: NY Times : Les bas salaires des enseignants ont un coût élevé pour la société

Message par John le Lun 2 Mai 2011 - 20:41

En même temps, le NY Times, il s'en fout un peu, du salaire médian en Grande-Bretagne.

_________________
En achetant des articles au lien ci-dessous, vous nous aidez, sans frais, à gérer le forum. Merci !


"Celui qui ne participe pas à la lutte participe à la défaite" (Brecht)
"La nostalgie, c'est plus ce que c'était" (Simone Signoret)
"Les médias participent à la falsification permanente de l'information" (Umberto Eco)

John
Médiateur


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: NY Times : Les bas salaires des enseignants ont un coût élevé pour la société

Message par lene75 le Lun 2 Mai 2011 - 21:37

M* alors, je gagne moins que le salaire médian en France !!!

_________________
Une classe, c'est comme une boîte de chocolats, on sait jamais sur quoi on va tomber...

lene75
Monarque


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: NY Times : Les bas salaires des enseignants ont un coût élevé pour la société

Message par John le Lun 2 Mai 2011 - 21:38

Moi j'avais entendu 1500, en plus.

_________________
En achetant des articles au lien ci-dessous, vous nous aidez, sans frais, à gérer le forum. Merci !


"Celui qui ne participe pas à la lutte participe à la défaite" (Brecht)
"La nostalgie, c'est plus ce que c'était" (Simone Signoret)
"Les médias participent à la falsification permanente de l'information" (Umberto Eco)

John
Médiateur


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: NY Times : Les bas salaires des enseignants ont un coût élevé pour la société

Message par Reine Margot le Lun 2 Mai 2011 - 22:05

@John a écrit:Moi j'avais entendu 1500, en plus.

moi aussi.

Reine Margot
Demi-dieu


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: NY Times : Les bas salaires des enseignants ont un coût élevé pour la société

Message par Pierre_au_carré le Lun 2 Mai 2011 - 22:21

@lene75 a écrit:M* alors, je gagne moins que le salaire médian en France !!!

A 80 %... Tu es hors-jeu car ça doit être "parmi les personnes à temps plein".
Effectivement j'avais plutôt entendu 1450 € net puis 1 500 € depuis quelques temps. Et 1 800 € pour la moyenne.

Pierre_au_carré
Guide spirituel


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: NY Times : Les bas salaires des enseignants ont un coût élevé pour la société

Message par lene75 le Lun 2 Mai 2011 - 22:43

@Pierre_au_carré a écrit:
@lene75 a écrit:M* alors, je gagne moins que le salaire médian en France !!!

A 80 %... Tu es hors-jeu car ça doit être "parmi les personnes à temps plein".
Effectivement j'avais plutôt entendu 1450 € net puis 1 500 € depuis quelques temps. Et 1 800 € pour la moyenne.

Je ne pense pas (on avait déjà eu ce genre de discussion) et je gagne moins de 1600€ (mais pas moins de 1500 vache ) à temps plein.

_________________
Une classe, c'est comme une boîte de chocolats, on sait jamais sur quoi on va tomber...

lene75
Monarque


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: NY Times : Les bas salaires des enseignants ont un coût élevé pour la société

Message par olivier-np30 le Mar 3 Mai 2011 - 8:12

J'ai lu dans la presse le chiffre il y a peu c'est 1590 mais très proche de 1600 : il faudrait que je retrouve.

Cela me semble plausible.

Quel que soit le job les gens gagnent tous à peu près la même chose : entre 1500 et 2500.

Au-dessus de 2600 c'est la classe aisée. Selon moi aisé c'est au-dessus de 3000 surtout en région parisienne.

C'est pour cela que je suis toujours circonspect quand des gens me disent "tu peux avoir mieux" ou j'en passe. La plupart des gens que nous croisons gagnent tous à peu près la même chose.

Parler de bas salaire pour 1250€ nets, ce à quoi j'ai démarré comme certifié stagiaire il y a 15 ans donc proche du smic, là je suis d'accord, après quand on parle de salaires qui se situent nécessairement dans une tranche aisée à savoir plus de 45k€ là je suis plus modéré.

Enfin dans l'article on ne démontre rien, on parle de la Corée du Sud mais je ne savais pas que le modèle éducatif y était formidable, quant à la Finlande j'ai regardé les grilles salariales et sur la durée ce n'est pas si extraordinaire que ça, sauf peut-être les 15 premières années. Cet article me semble assez vide.

_________________
Quadra aujourd'hui, quinqua demain

olivier-np30
Habitué du forum


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: NY Times : Les bas salaires des enseignants ont un coût élevé pour la société

Message par John le Mar 3 Mai 2011 - 11:04

après quand on parle de salaires qui se situent nécessairement dans une tranche aisée à savoir plus de 45k€ là je suis plus modéré.
Au moins l'article est compréhensible, et pourtant il est rédigé dans une langue étrangère.

_________________
En achetant des articles au lien ci-dessous, vous nous aidez, sans frais, à gérer le forum. Merci !


"Celui qui ne participe pas à la lutte participe à la défaite" (Brecht)
"La nostalgie, c'est plus ce que c'était" (Simone Signoret)
"Les médias participent à la falsification permanente de l'information" (Umberto Eco)

John
Médiateur


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: NY Times : Les bas salaires des enseignants ont un coût élevé pour la société

Message par retraitée le Mar 3 Mai 2011 - 15:35

J'aurais pourtant aimé qu'on me le traduisît!

retraitée
Vénérable


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut


 
Permission de ce forum:
Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum