Partagez
Voir le sujet précédentAller en basVoir le sujet suivant
avatar
JPhMM
Demi-dieu

[Article] First Direct Observations of Quantum Effects in an Optomechanical System

par JPhMM le Jeu 16 Aoû 2012 - 11:12
First Direct Observations of Quantum Effects in an Optomechanical System

ScienceDaily (Aug. 15, 2012) — A long-time staple of science fiction is the tractor beam, a technology in which light is used to move massive objects -- recall the tractor beam in the movie Star Wars that captured the Millennium Falcon and pulled it into the Death Star. While tractor beams of this sort remain science fiction, beams of light today are being used to mechanically manipulate atoms or tiny glass beads, with rapid progress being made to control increasingly larger objects. Those who see major roles for optomechanical systems in a host of future technologies will take heart in the latest results from a first-of-its-kind experiment.

Scientists with the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and the University of California (UC) Berkeley, using a unique optical trapping system that provides ensembles of ultracold atoms, have recorded the first direct observations of distinctly quantum optical effects -- amplification and squeezing -- in an optomechanical system. Their findings point the way toward low-power quantum optical devices and enhanced detection of gravitational waves among other possibilities.

"We've shown for the first time that the quantum fluctuations in a light field are responsible for driving the motions of objects much larger than an electron and could in principle drive the motion of really large objects," says Daniel Brooks, a scientist with Berkeley Lab's Materials Sciences Division and UC Berkeley's Physics Department.

Brooks, a member of Dan Stamper-Kurn's research group, is the corresponding author of a paper in the journal Nature describing this research. The paper is titled "Nonclassical light generated by quantum-noise-driven cavity optomechanics." Co-authors were Thierry Botter, Sydney Schreppler, Thomas Purdy, Nathan Brahms and Stamper-Kurn.

Light will build-up inside of an optical cavity at specific resonant frequencies, similar to how a held-down guitar string only vibrates to produce specific tones. Positioning a mechanical resonator inside the cavity changes the resonance frequency for light passing through, much as sliding one's fingers up and down a guitar string changes its vibrational tones. Meanwhile, as light passes through the optical cavity, it acts like a tiny tractor beam, pushing and pulling on the mechanical resonator.

If an optical cavity is of ultrahigh quality and the mechanical resonator element within is atomic-sized and chilled to nearly absolute zero, the resulting cavity optomechanical system can be used to detect even the slightest mechanical motion. Likewise, even the tiniest fluctuations in the light/vacuum can cause the atoms to wiggle. Changes to the light can provide control over that atomic motion. This not only opens the door to fundamental studies of quantum mechanics that could tell us more about the "classical" world we humans inhabit, but also to quantum information processing, ultrasensitive force sensors, and other technologies that might seem like science fiction today.

"There have been proposals to use optomechanical devices as transducers, for example coupling motion to both microwaves and optical frequency light, where one could convert photons from one frequency range to the other," Brooks says. "There have also been proposals for slowing or storing light in the mechanical degrees of freedom, the equivalent of electromagnetically induced transparency or EIT, where a photon is stored within the internal degrees of freedom."

Already cavity optomechanics has led to applications such as the cooling of objects to their motional ground state, and detections of force and motion on the attometer scale. However, in studying interactions between light and mechanical motion, it has been a major challenge to distinguish those effects that are distinctly quantum from those that are classical -- a distinction critical to the future exploitation of optomechanics.

Brooks, Stamper-Kurn and their colleagues were able to meet the challenge with their microfabricated atom-chip system which provides a magnetic trap for capturing a gas made up of thousands of ultracold atoms. This ensemble of ultracold atoms is then transferred into an optical cavity (Fabry-Pferot) where it is trapped in a one-dimensional optical lattice formed by near-infrared (850 nanometer wavelength) light that resonates with the cavity. A second beam of light is used for the pump/probe.

"Integrating trapped ensembles of ultracold atoms and high-finesse cavities with an atom chip allowed us to study and control the classical and quantum interactions between photons and the internal/external degrees of freedom of the atom ensemble," Brooks says. "In contrast to typical solid-state mechanical systems, our optically levitated ensemble of ultracold atoms is isolated from its environment, causing its motion to be driven predominantly by quantum radiation-pressure fluctuations."

The Berkeley research team first applied classical light modulation to a low-powered pump/probe beam (36 picoWatts) entering their optical cavity to demonstrate that their system behaves as a high-gain parametric optomechanical amplifier. They then extinguished the classical drive and mapped the response to the fluctuations of the vacuum. This enabled them to observe light being squeezed by its interaction with the vibrating ensemble and the atomic motion driven by the light's quantum fluctuations. Amplification and this squeezing interaction, which is called "ponderomotive force," have been long-sought goals of optomechanics research.

"Parametric amplification typically requires a lot of power in the optical pump but the small mass of our ensemble required very few photons to turn the interactions on/off," Brooks says. "The ponderomotive squeezing we saw, while narrow in frequency, was a natural consequence of having radiation-pressure shot noise dominate in our system."

Since squeezing light improves the sensitivity of gravitational wave detectors, the ponderomotive squeezing effects observed by Brooks, Stamper-Kern and their colleagues could play a role in future detectors. The idea behind gravitational wave detection is that a ripple in the local curvature of spacetime caused by a passing gravitational wave will modify the resonant frequency of an optical cavity which, in turn, will alter the cavity's optical signal.

"Currently, squeezing light over a wide range of frequencies is desirable as scientists search for the first detection of a gravitational wave," Brooks explains. "Ponderomotive squeezing, should be valuable later when specific signals want to be studied in detail by improving the signal-to-noise ratio in the specific frequency range of interest."

The results of this study differ significantly from standard linear model predictions. This suggests that a nonlinear optomechanical theory is required to account for the Berkeley team's observations that optomechanical interactions generate non-classical light. Stamper-Kern's research group is now considering further experiments involving two ensembles of ultracold atoms inside the optical cavity.

"The squeezing signal we observe is quite small when we detect the suppression of quantum fluctuations outside the cavity, yet the suppression of these fluctuations should be very large inside the cavity," Brooks says. "With a two ensemble configuration, one ensemble would be responsible for the optomechanical interaction to squeeze the radiation-pressure fluctuations and the second ensemble would be studied to measure the squeezing inside the cavity."

This research was funded by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research and the National Science Foundation.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/08/120815142052.htm?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+sciencedaily+%28ScienceDaily%3A+Latest+Science+News%29&utm_content=Yahoo!+Mail

_________________
Labyrinthe où l'admiration des ignorants et des idiots qui prennent pour savoir profond tout ce qu'ils n'entendent pas, les a retenus, bon gré malgré qu'ils en eussent. D'ailleurs, il n'y a point de meilleur moyen pour mettre en vogue ou pour défendre des doctrines étranges et absurdes, que de les munir d'une légion de mots obscurs, douteux , et indéterminés. Ce qui pourtant rend ces retraites bien plus semblables à des cavernes de brigands ou à des tanières de renards qu'à des forteresses de généreux guerriers. Que s'il est malaisé d'en chasser ceux qui s'y réfugient, ce n'est pas à cause de la force de ces lieux-là, mais à cause des ronces, des épines et de l'obscurité des buissons dont ils sont environnés. Car la fausseté étant par elle-même incompatible avec l'esprit de l'homme, il n'y a que l'obscurité qui puisse servir de défense à ce qui est absurde. — John Locke

Je crois que je ne crois en rien. Mais j'ai des doutes. — Jacques Goimard
avatar
Gryphe
Médiateur

Re: [Article] First Direct Observations of Quantum Effects in an Optomechanical System

par Gryphe le Jeu 16 Aoû 2012 - 11:20
Would you be kind to make a little summary in french for us, please ? flower

_________________
Τί ἐστιν ἀλήθεια ;

Certaines rubriques de Neoprofs.org sont en accès restreint. Pour en savoir plus, c'est par ici : http://www.neoprofs.org/t48247-topics-en-acces-restreint-forum-accessible-uniquement-sur-demande-edition-2017
avatar
Will.T
Prophète

Re: [Article] First Direct Observations of Quantum Effects in an Optomechanical System

par Will.T le Jeu 16 Aoû 2012 - 11:34
c'est pourtant limpide Razz
avatar
Gryphe
Médiateur

Re: [Article] First Direct Observations of Quantum Effects in an Optomechanical System

par Gryphe le Jeu 16 Aoû 2012 - 11:45
Messant ! Laughing

_________________
Τί ἐστιν ἀλήθεια ;

Certaines rubriques de Neoprofs.org sont en accès restreint. Pour en savoir plus, c'est par ici : http://www.neoprofs.org/t48247-topics-en-acces-restreint-forum-accessible-uniquement-sur-demande-edition-2017
avatar
Will.T
Prophète

Re: [Article] First Direct Observations of Quantum Effects in an Optomechanical System

par Will.T le Jeu 16 Aoû 2012 - 11:47
tient avec google translate (coucou les profs d'anglais Razz)

Premières observations directes des effets quantiques dans un système opto-mécanique

ScienceDaily (15 août 2012) - Une base de longue date de la science-fiction est le rayon tracteur, une technologie dans laquelle la lumière est utilisé pour déplacer des objets massifs - rappeler le rayon tracteur dans le film Star Wars qui ont capturé le Faucon Millenium et il a tiré dans la Death Star. Bien rayons tracteurs de cette nature demeurent la science-fiction, des faisceaux de lumière aujourd'hui sont utilisés pour manipuler des atomes ou mécaniquement minuscules perles de verre, avec les progrès rapides réalisés pour contrôler des objets de plus en plus grandes. Ceux qui voient les rôles majeurs pour les systèmes opto-mécaniques dans une foule de technologies de l'avenir aura le cœur dans les derniers résultats d'une première en son genre-expérience.

Les scientifiques avec le ministère américain de l'Énergie Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) et l'Université de Californie (UC) à Berkeley, en utilisant un système de piégeage optique unique qui fournit des ensembles d'atomes ultrafroids, ont enregistré les premières observations directes de nettement des effets quantiques optiques - amplification et en serrant - dans un système opto-mécanique. Leurs conclusions montrent la voie vers des dispositifs quantiques de faible puissance optique et de détection améliorée des ondes gravitationnelles entre autres possibilités. "Nous avons montré pour la première fois que les fluctuations quantiques dans un champ de lumière sont responsables de la conduite des mouvements des objets beaucoup plus grande que un électron et pourrait en principe conduire le mouvement des objets très grands », explique Daniel Brooks, un scientifique à la Division Berkeley Lab Sciences des Matériaux et de l'UC Berkeley Département de Physique. Brooks, un membre du groupe de recherche Dan Stamper-Kurn, est l'auteur correspondant de un article dans la revue Nature décrivant cette recherche. Le document est intitulé "la lumière non classique générée par optomécanique quantique en cavité-bruit moteur." Les co-auteurs étaient Thierry Botter, Sydney Schreppler, Thomas Purdy, Nathan Brahms et Stamper-Kurn. Lumière sera l'accumulation à l'intérieur d'une cavité optique à des fréquences de résonance spécifiques, semblable à la façon dont une corde de guitare détenus par ne vibre que pour produire des tons spécifiques . Le positionnement d'un résonateur mécanique à l'intérieur de la cavité modifie la fréquence de résonance pour la lumière passant à travers, la mesure du glissement ses doigts de haut en bas un changement de chaîne de guitare ses tonalités vibratoires. Pendant ce temps, que la lumière passe à travers la cavité optique, il agit comme un minuscule rayon tracteur, pousser et tirer sur le résonateur mécanique. Si une cavité optique est de qualité très haute et l'élément résonateur mécanique dans les entreprises est atomique et réfrigérés à zéro presque absolu , le système opto-mécanique résultant cavité peut être utilisé pour détecter la moindre mouvement mécanique. De même, jusque dans les moindres fluctuations de la lumière / vide peut provoquer des atomes à se tortiller. Les modifications apportées à la lumière peut permettre de contrôler que le mouvement des atomes. Ce n'est pas seulement ouvre la porte à des études fondamentales de la mécanique quantique qui pourrait nous en dire plus au sujet de la "classique" du monde, nous les humains habitent, mais aussi pour le traitement quantique de l'information, des capteurs de force ultrasensibles, et d'autres technologies qui peuvent sembler de la science fiction d'aujourd'hui. " Il ya eu des propositions visant à utiliser des dispositifs opto-mécaniques comme des transducteurs, par exemple coupler le mouvement à la fois micro-ondes et la lumière de fréquence optique, où l'on pouvait convertir les photons d'une plage de fréquence à l'autre, "dit Brooks. "Il ya eu également des propositions pour ralentir ou stocker de la lumière dans les degrés de liberté mécaniques, l'équivalent de la transparence induite électromagnétiquement ou IET, où un photon est stockée dans les degrés de liberté internes." Déjà optomécanique cavité a conduit à des applications telles que la refroidissement des objets à leur état ​​fondamental de mouvement, et les détections de force et de mouvement à l'échelle attomètre. Cependant, en étudiant les interactions entre la lumière et de mouvement mécanique, il a été un défi majeur pour distinguer les effets qui sont nettement quantique de ceux qui sont classiques -. Une distinction essentielle à l'exploitation future de optomécanique Brooks, Stamper-Kurn et leurs collègues étaient en mesure de relever le défi avec leur microfabriqué atome-chip système qui fournit un piège magnétique pour capturer un gaz composé de milliers d'atomes ultrafroids. Cet ensemble d'atomes ultrafroids est ensuite transféré dans une cavité optique (Fabry-Pferot) où il est piégé dans un réseau unidimensionnel optique formée par le proche infrarouge (850 nm de longueur d'onde) lumière qui résonne avec la cavité. Un second faisceau de lumière est utilisé pour la pompe / sonde. "Intégrer ensembles d'atomes ultrafroids piégés et de haute finesse des cavités avec une puce à atomes nous a permis d'étudier et de contrôler les interactions classiques et quantiques entre photons et les degrés internes / externes de la liberté de l'ensemble atome, "dit Brooks. "Contrairement à l'état solide typiques des systèmes mécaniques, notre ensemble optiquement lévitation d'atomes ultrafroids est isolée de son environnement, ce qui provoque son mouvement pour être entraînée principalement par rayonnement quantique pression fluctuations." L'équipe de recherche de Berkeley abord appliqué modulation de la lumière classique à un de faible puissance de la pompe / sonde de faisceau (36 picowatts) entrant dans leur cavité optique de démontrer que leur système se comporte comme un amplificateur à gain élevé paramétrique optomécanique. Ils ont ensuite éteint le lecteur classique et cartographié la réponse aux fluctuations du vide. Cela leur a permis d'observer la lumière étant pressé par son interaction avec l'ensemble vibrant et le mouvement des atomes conduit par les fluctuations quantiques de la lumière. Amplification et cette interaction serrant, qui est appelé "force pondéromotrice," ont été recherchés depuis longtemps par les objectifs de la recherche optomécanique. "amplification paramétrique nécessite généralement beaucoup de puissance dans le pompage optique, mais la faible masse de notre ensemble très peu de photons nécessaires pour transformer les interactions on / off », dit Brooks. "Le pondéromotrice serrant nous l'avons vu, tout étroite de la fréquence, était une conséquence naturelle de bruit de grenaille ayant un rayonnement pression dominent dans notre système." Depuis serrant la lumière améliore la sensibilité des détecteurs d'ondes gravitationnelles, l'pondéromoteurs serrant les effets observés par Brooks, Stamper- Kern et leurs collègues ont pu jouer un rôle dans les détecteurs à venir. L'idée derrière détection d'ondes gravitationnelles, c'est que une ondulation dans la courbure locale de l'espace-temps provoquée par une vague passant gravitationnelle va modifier la fréquence de résonance d'une cavité optique qui, à son tour, va modifier signal optique de la cavité. "Actuellement, la lumière serrant sur ​​une large gamme de fréquences est souhaitable que la recherche scientifiques pour la première détection d'une onde gravitationnelle, "explique Brooks. "Pondéromotrice serrant, devrait être utile plus tard lorsque les signaux spécifiques veulent être étudiées en détail par l'amélioration du rapport signal-bruit dans la gamme de fréquence spécifique d'intérêt." Les résultats de cette étude diffèrent sensiblement de standards prédictions du modèle linéaire. Ceci suggère qu'une théorie non linéaire optomécanique est nécessaire pour tenir compte des observations de l'équipe de Berkeley selon laquelle les interactions optomécaniques générer des non-classique de la lumière. Groupe de recherche Stamper-Kern est désormais en considération les expériences d'autres impliquant deux ensembles d'atomes ultrafroids à l'intérieur de la cavité optique. "Le signal de compression que nous observons est assez faible quand on détecter la suppression des fluctuations quantiques en dehors de la cavité, mais la suppression de ces fluctuations devraient être très grand à l'intérieur de la cavité, "dit Brooks. "Avec une configuration à deux ensemble, un ensemble serait responsable de l'interaction optomécanique pour presser les fluctuations de rayonnement pression et le deuxième ensemble sera étudié pour mesurer la compression à l'intérieur de la cavité." Cette recherche a été financée par le Bureau de la Force aérienne de la recherche scientifique la recherche et de la National Science
yphrog
Sage

Re: [Article] First Direct Observations of Quantum Effects in an Optomechanical System

par yphrog le Jeu 16 Aoû 2012 - 11:56
@Gryphe a écrit:Would you be kind enough to make a little summary in French for us, please ? flower

+1

beam us up, JPhMM!

Spoiler:
ponderomotive squeezing I love you


Dernière édition par xphrog le Jeu 16 Aoû 2012 - 11:59, édité 2 fois
avatar
Gryphe
Médiateur

Re: [Article] First Direct Observations of Quantum Effects in an Optomechanical System

par Gryphe le Jeu 16 Aoû 2012 - 11:57
Ah, mais tout de suite, c'est beaucoup plus clair, merci Will (et JP) ! idee
Le rayon-tracteur, c'est génial ce truc !
darkvador
Je veux un rayon-tracteur pour porter mes bagages quand je pars en vacances, pour me téléporter direct' jusqu'à la gare sorciere2 , et, en période scolaire, pour ramener fissa tous les élèves retardataires jusque pile devant le bureau des CPE. furieux

Dreams are my reality... Very Happy

_________________
Τί ἐστιν ἀλήθεια ;

Certaines rubriques de Neoprofs.org sont en accès restreint. Pour en savoir plus, c'est par ici : http://www.neoprofs.org/t48247-topics-en-acces-restreint-forum-accessible-uniquement-sur-demande-edition-2017
Contenu sponsorisé

Re: [Article] First Direct Observations of Quantum Effects in an Optomechanical System

par Contenu sponsorisé
Voir le sujet précédentRevenir en hautVoir le sujet suivant
Permission de ce forum:
Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum